Israeli startup Kaminario raises $75 million to expand flash storage services
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on Reddit
Share on Email

Image Credit: Screen shot from Kaminario

Image Credit: Screen shot from Kaminario

Built on an all-flash model, this Israeli-Boston company is changing how we do storage

Boston HQ-ed Kaminario announced on Tuesday the close of $75 million in new funding, led by private equity firm the Waterwood Group out of Hong Kong.

Joining the round was also newcomer CE Ventures, along with existing backers Pitango Venture Capital, Globespan Capital Partners, Sequoia Capital, Lazarus Hedge Fund, and Silicon Valley Bank, which all took part in a $53 million Series E round from December 2014, with a subsequent follow-on $15 million round in January 2015.

This latest injection of capital brings Kaminario to $218 million in total funding raised.

The privately held company was founded in 2008 by CEO Dani Golan, previously of Performix Technologies and EMC. With a reported 235 employees, Kaminario has offices in Boston, Haifa, New York, and Silicon Valley.

The company specializes in storage products and services for enterprise, having launched their K2 array back in 2010. Built on an all-flash architecture, as opposed to older hard disk technologies with moving parts that have been modernized to work with flash, Kaminario works with clients like Telefónica and Nuance Communications to optimize their ability to store and work with data as the backbone of their cloud networks.

With their new funding in hand, the company says that they plan on growing their reach globally, expanding their work in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific. They will also continue developing their products to meet the needs of clients in the cloud.

Kaminario Founder and CEO Dani Golan. Photo Credit: Kaminario PR

Kaminario Founder and CEO Dani Golan. Photo Credit: Kaminario PR

My thoughts

Moving ahead, the Kaminario team will still be up against some healthy competition from companies like Nimble Storage and Pure Storage, as well as big players like EMC.

While perhaps one of the less sexy sides of the tech space, fast and agile storage is an integral element of the new cloud economy. Considered to be more dynamic than legacy hard disk systems, the all-flash gives its users a more adaptable system from which to build on as technology continues to advance rapidly.

It should be noted that while it has come down in price significantly, flash is still a more expensive way to store data than hard disks, so even as it comes with some very strong advantages, it is far from cheap.

But the Kaminario crew makes the argument that as the SaaS model continues to overtake that of on-premises solutions, their kind of smart storage will become increasingly more important and cost effective over time, thus giving it an edge to win out in the end.

Share on:Share
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on Reddit
Share on Email
Gabriel Avner

About Gabriel Avner


Gabriel has an unhealthy obsession with new messaging apps, social media and pretty much anything coming out of Apple. An experienced security and conflict consultant, he has written for The Diplomatic Club, the Marine War College, and covers military affairs with TLV1 radio. He mostly enjoys reading articles wherever his ADD leads him to and training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. EEED 44D4 B8F4 24BE F77E 2DEA 0243 CBD1 3F7C F4B6

More Goodies From Big Data


How Cognitive Search Eliminates Common Struggles Website Users Face

How did Big Data transform the manufacturing industry?

10 ways to save money with AWS Redshift