‘Pink collar’ jobs are growing now, but could be hit hard by technology
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Young woman with headset, Symbol: CallCenter, Service, etc. Photo credit: Ulrich Baumgarten via Getty Images Israel

Young woman with headset, Symbol: CallCenter, Service, etc. Photo credit: Ulrich Baumgarten via Getty Images Israel

Because of AI, the US could experience 6 percent job loss across the board by 2021 – and it’s not looking good for women, either

Is it time for men to put on the pink collar?

A New York Times report shows that technology is increasingly replacing jobs that have been traditionally held by men, like machine operating, locomotive firing and vehicle electronics installation. Meanwhile, the fastest job growth in the U.S. is hitting the “pink collar” sector, or those jobs traditionally held by women. The healthcare industry in particular is seeing explosive growth.

The Times reports, however, that although men are losing their blue collar jobs, they tend to avoid pink collar jobs, which have lower pay and are seen as stigmatized, even though they provide better opportunities for wage growth than the blue collar jobs that are disappearing.

While pink collar jobs are seeing growth (and frustratingly, the salaries of these sectors drop the more women enter them), it’s only a matter of time before technology disrupts the ‘pink sector,’ too. A Forrester report released in September predicts that the US will see 6 percent of its jobs replaced by AI technology by 2021. The hardest hit will be office and administrative jobs, which are widely held by women. As AI technology like digital assistants and chatbots becomes more prevalent, it remains to be seen how pink collar job growth may be affected.

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