Two months after launching their first product, Israeli big data startup JethroData raises $8.1M
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The Jethrodata team at the StrataConf conference. Photo Credit: @qrislarsen

While the SQL-Over-Hadoop market is small today, the need to process big data will only increase, which means that this market will undoubtedly grow in the coming years

According to Geektime sources, Israeli startup JethroData, which has developed a database that runs analytics directly on top of the Hadoop platform, raised a Series B round of funding worth $8.1 million in the last several weeks. Australian VC firm Square Peg Capital led the firm’s second funding round to date and Israeli firm Pitango Venture Capital, which invested in the company’s first round, joined this round as well. To date, the startup has raised $12.5 million.

Fast answers to complex analytical questions

Boaz Raufman, Ronen Ovadya, and Eli Singer founded the startup, which has 20 employees in its Ra’anana and New York offices, in 2012. The company is respected as one of the leading SQL-Over-Hadoop providers, a disruptive model for companies querying big data databases on Hadoop technology. JethroData officially launched the first version of its product, JethroData 1.0, only two months ago and at the beginning of this month, they appeared on the DBTA 100 2015 list, which ranks the top 100 “companies that matter most in data.”

JethroData’s technology offers a database that stores information on Hadoop in the form of columns, and builds an index for each of the columns. This solves the problem of flat data structuring, since most big data databases store information horizontally to save space, but which makes querying much more difficult. Instead, JethroData mimics a relational database over Hadoop and creates a built-in cache mechanism (which, according to the company, is one of the product’s biggest advantages) that holds queries in memory to bring a faster reply to the company performing the query. This approach enables fast responses to complex analytical questions, and allows big data processing in real-time, without the need to create and maintain two different databases.

A narrow and highly competitive market

When the company first started in 2012, there was only one serious competitor, Apache Hive. Since then, the need for such a product has grown and so has the market of startups providing SQL-Over-Hadoop solutions. Just in the last year, 10 different SQL-Over-Hadoop startups have been launched solutions that directly compete with JethroData: CitusDB, Cloudera Impala, Concurrent Lingual, Hadapt, InfiniDB, MammothDB, MemSQL, Pivotal HawQ, Progress DataDirect, ScleraDB, Simba, and Splice Machine.

According to the company, the product’s response time to SQL queries is up to 100 times faster, and it can connect to virtually any business intelligence enterprise using standard Connector. Still, JethroData’s product seems similar to others, and the large companies that would be interested in such a solution, such as Amazon, Facebook, etc, have largely developed their own solutions to address this issue. This is undoubtedly a significant challenge going forward.

While the SQL-Over-Hadoop market is small today, the need to process big data will only increase, which means that this market will grow in the coming years as well. Considering there is no current market leader, JethroData’s chances of succeeding are not bad at all.

Laura Rosbrow translated the original post.

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Yaniv Feldman

About Yaniv Feldman


Chief-Geek at GeekTime. An Entrepreneur at heart with technology running in his veins. Yaniv has been writing about and analyzing the Israeli and European startup and technology scene for the past 5 years and his favorite hobby is finding complicated solutions to very simple problems.

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