This app lets you copy and paste stuff between your laptop and smartphone seamlessly
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Photo Credit: Screenshot from Pasteasy's website

The app has made waves on ProductHunt, climbing to the top of the charts last week

Tech in Asia

If you’re in the business of tech like me (and if you’re reading this, chances are that it is so), you probably often find yourself sending things back and forth between your laptop and your smartphone to get work done. Chances are that you find it a pain in the butt to accomplish.

As an example, whenever I attend events, I often use my iPhone’s camera to grab shots for use in articles. To move the images to my laptop, I typically transfer them into my Dropbox or Pushbullet app, and then open them in the corresponding folder or app on my Macbook. Not too difficult, but not exactly seamless either.

Which is why I was really excited when I received an email from mobile app startup Tinker introducing me to an app it had created called Pasteasy, available for download on iOS and Android, as well as OS X and Windows for the desktop versions. On its website is the bold claim, “Copy on the phone, paste on the computer […] lightning fast […] super simple & convenient.”

Naturally, I had to give it a shot. As proudly proclaimed on the website, founder Neeraj Jhanji says that Pasteasy would allow me to instantly copy and paste text and photos directly between my devices. All I had to do was install the respective apps on my Macbook and iPhone, and pair them up via WiFi – no login or registration necessary.

Photo Credit: Pasteasy

Photo Credit: Pasteasy

Pairing is done by using the smartphone to scan a barcode on the desktop app, as shown below.

Photo Credit: Pasteasy

Photo Credit: Pasteasy

Once the devices are paired, any image or text that is copied on one device will appear right away on the other. To test this, I snapped a photo using my iPhone, and was pleasantly surprised to see it pop up almost instantly on my Macbook via a notification. The image was then accessible in a Pasteasy folder on the laptop, which is automatically created when the app is installed.

I tried this out with a screenshot and it appears instantly on my Macbook as well, which is neat.

Copying and pasting text works slightly differently. When I first attempted to copy text on my iPhone, I couldn’t find it in the corresponding folder on my Macbook. Jhanji tells me that the text doesn’t appear in the folder, but instead is saved onto the laptop’s clipboard, ready to be pasted anywhere.

The reverse works just as well. Copying image or text on my Macbook would cause it to appear on my Pasteasy iPhone app, as well as on the smartphone’s clipboard for immediate pasting. Piece of cake.

A premium alternative

Jhanji claims that Pasteasy is up to 30 times faster than alternatives, and this is achieved by skipping the cloud altogether. “For proximity sharing, we felt that by skipping the cloud and transferring content device-to-device over local WiFi, we can create a real-time, smooth user experience,” he says. “We decided to use the copy/paste paradigm as it is integrated in every application on every OS platform already and we all know how to use that.”

The downside of that, however, is that it’s easy to forget that the app is constantly running in the background. After a few hours of work, I realized that the app on my phone was deluged with a series of text and images that I had copied on my laptop without the intention of transferring them via Pasteasy – thankfully up to a preset limit of 20 items – and vice versa. To remedy this, I turned off the “Save Incoming Photo” option on my iPhone app. There is, however, no similar function on the desktop version.

The app has made waves on ProductHunt, climbing to the top of the charts. One user was worried that because the app is constantly running in the background, it would drain the smartphone’s battery quickly. Jhanji reassured him that Pasteasy “uses Bluetooth LE and WiFi so the impact on battery life is minimal.”

One disadvantage that Pasteasy has compared to its competitors is that its smartphone app is not free – it currently costs $1.99 at a promotional rate of 50 percent off. However, Jhanji is confident that his app’s smoothness would convince users to part with the cash.

Tinker isn’t Jhanji’s first foray into the startup world. Back in 1999, he founded what is widely known as the world’s first mobile social network, called ImaHima. It was there that he invented the concepts of mobile check-in and status updates, and subsequently sold his patents to Facebook in 2013.

This post was originally published on Tech in Asia.

Featured Image Credit: Pasteasy.

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Daniel Tay

About Daniel Tay


Daniel is a writer based in the sunny island of Singapore. He mainly covers the tech scene in Singapore for Tech in Asia, but his byline can be found in a variety of publications and blogs, including Social Media Today, Business2Community, Canva and Unbounce. He is madly passionate about entrepreneurship, marketing, and productivity.

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