How to Attract Angel Investors with PR and Your Blog
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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

You might already know that companies that blog generally have more-consistent sales. But did you know that start-ups that blog and use related public-relations effectively have a better chance of attracting angel investors as well?

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

You might already know that companies that blog generally have more-consistent sales. But did you know that start-ups that blog and use related public-relations effectively have a better chance of attracting angel investors as well?

In today’s financial climate, it can be extremely difficult to obtain seed investment – so every available and relevant resource needs to be directed, at least in part, towards that end. Inc.com writer Matthew DeLuca understands this point well:

Edward Williams, partner at Brook Venture Partners, says that he looks at all the standard data when considering an investment, but treats blogs a little differently.

If a company has a blog, he says, he’ll look at that to get a fuller picture of what the company and the founder are like, and, though blogging is often thought of as an informal medium, Williams’ standards are no less exacting.

DeLuca goes on to interview several angel investors and presents their important points. We wanted to do the same and provide some additional fodder for financial consideration.

  • Present industry data and statistics in the relevant blog posts. SilverRail Technology CEO Aaron Gowell told the writer that his firm tries “to make our posts fairly statistic-based, and it is deliberately written so potential investors and partners look at this stuff.” In other words, blog about the minutiae of what your company does and its analysis of the sector – but, in the context of the medium, is a simple-and-concise way – so that potential investors will not need to find and research all of the information themselves. Make it readily accessible through the blog.
  • Highlight mentions by independent, outside publications. If the Wall Street Journal highlights how your start-up company will revolutionize the world, do not just regulate and bury the clip on a back page under “News” or “Press Releases.” It is crucial to highlight it in a blog post as well so that it will be sent through your RSS feed, social media, and elsewhere. (As we often say, it is important to use a holistic-marketing strategy that incorporates all of these types of elements.) This way, angel investors who may be interested in financing will see your mentions with as little effort on their parts as possible.
  • (Perhaps!) publish potential bids and sales. DeLuca, in the Inc.com article, tells a short story of how a company published a bid from an investment firm – though in an anonymous way – and received additional, competing bids as a result. This is an interesting point, and we are not sure we agree. At the least, we would recommend pursuing this tactic only with extreme caution and with keeping the context and investment firm in mind. In your attempt to get a few more million dollars, you might lose the entire bid.
  • Build expertise and use that to contribute to other outlets. Once your blog becomes recognized and followed by others in your industry, it will become increasingly possible to use that authority to submit articles to other publications. If everyone in your niche follows your blog, then you can leverage that to get a by-lined article in, for example, Businessweek. The thought-leadership increase between internal blog-posts and external articles can become a self-perpetuating cycle of PR.
  • Use a media- and analyst-relation campaign. No matter how interesting and relevant your blog posts and PR, it will account for little unless the relevant people find and share them – especially at the beginning, when your companies is just struggling to survive and your blog has not yet taken off.

Most companies view blogs mainly as method to increase their thought leadership in their industries and search-engine rankings. While these are both accurate and beneficial reasons, it is also important to imagine other possible uses in public relations that may be relevant to your business – whether you are a start-up or not.

This post was originally published on The Cline Group blog

Photo Credit: Shutterstock/ Word Blog on the background of one hundred dollar bills

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