6Scan Israel completes first funding round
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Photo Credit: PR

6Scan, whom are graduates of the first cycle of startups at VentureGeeks Accelerator, have completed an initial round of funding led by Zone Labs and other private investors

Photo Credit: PR

Photo Credit: PR

Israeli startup 6Scan, developers of security solutions for bloggers and small website owners using the WordPress platform, has completed their first round of funding. The round was led serial entrepreneur Gregor Freund – founder and CEO of Zone Labs later acquired by Checkpoint 2004, and other private investors. The company raised a seed round earlier from Yoav Leitersdorf’s YLVentures and round Pre Seed from the VentureGeeks program back in 2011.

6Scan was founded in early 2011 by Nitzan Miron and Yaron Tal, two security experts and alumni of the Israeli army’s Center for Code & Security. Their vision is to afford small sites the same protections currently reserved for the larger online operations: “Most of the existing solutions are too expensive for small and medium websites or those that provide a partial response to threats,” says Meron. “So we figured there’s a need to find a solution to protect the small sites from similar cases at a low cost and that will allow publishers to defend against hacker attacks.”

Scan & Fix

6Scan’s solution consists of two main components: first, 6Scan scans sites regularly looking for information security holes that could compromise the system. If found, 6Scan handles the repair. “Most packages offering security solutions for website inform owners that they have breaches but they often break off their service there, leaving site owner to deal with a collection of security holes they have no idea how to fix. Those who have the money invite Security Specialists to help them address the issues but most site owners don’t have the budget or the time to deal with it so their sites are left unprotected.”

Photo Credit: PR, Screenshot

Photo Credit: PR, Screenshot

Yaron Tal, chief technology officer at 6Scan told Geektime how the idea for 6Scan came about: “In May of 2010 we found ourselves sitting in front of the TV and watching a broadcast of the Gaza flotilla violently clashing with the IDF as they tried to run the blockade. The typical anti Israel reaction was not long in following and dozens of Israeli websites were hacked with messages against Israel and the IDF. The attacks continued and intensified in early 2011. When we looked for ways to protect against such attacks we noticed that the existing solutions are too expensive or give website owners only partial responses to threats. We decided it was necessary to build a robust solution to protect small sites from similar attacks at low cost.”

Using patented technology, the system developed by 6Secan analyzes the destination site to find threats and security breaches. Then, another component system activates automatically to patch up vulnerabilities exploited by hackers. 6Scan’s technology combines active and passive protection and thus provides protection layers that were hereto only accessible to sites with large budgets. The product was designed so that users with no technical knowledge or background in information security can use it and benefit from the protection that 6Scan offers at an affordable  price for small business.

Disclosure:  6Scan is a graduate of the Israeli VentureGeeks accelerator program run by Geek Media, the parent company of Geektime.com.

 

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Avishay Bassa

About Avishay Bassa


Seasoned web developer, Gadget freak and loves everything Google, Android and open source. Avishay is the guy in charge of dismantling every new gadget that dares step into our office and hopefully put it back together and write a review about it afterwards.

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