South Korea has the fastest internet worldwide, US is ranked twelfth
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Smiling young business woman in Seoul downtown, South Korea. Photo Credit: LeoPatrizi

Smiling young business woman in Seoul downtown, South Korea. Photo Credit: LeoPatrizi

Internet connection speed worldwide has risen 21% year-over-year, Akamai reports

Akamai’s Q3 “state of the internet” report for 2016 shows that the US still has a long way to go to reach the same pace as a number of East Asian and Western European countries for connectivity. Still, the data shows improvement from the last quarter, Q2, and is continuing to improve from previous reports. Compare the data from Akamai in that preceding quarter with today’s:

Source: Geektime (Data via Akamai)

Source: Geektime (Data via Akamai)

The US is clearly moving up, from 15.3 to 16.3. But at close to half of all wireline connections in the 50 states, plus Washington, D.C., are still run at less than the 25 Mbps standard set by the FFC. (Beyond that number, up to 13% of Americans don’t use the internet at all, according to Pew.)

If each US state counted as a country, though, several would beat actual countries based on Akamai’s Q3 data:

Image Credit: Akamai

Image Credit: Akamai

It’s not enough, though, and the US’s huge size and lack of public infrastructure investment means it will continue to struggle to attain the heights that other, much smaller nations are already averaging. Fixed connections still continue to grow, totaling 102 million in 2015, but have been surpassed by the faster-growing mobile (253 million) segment.

A typical response to these trends, from Akamai’s reports, notes that “after spending millions of dollars laying fiber to connect a small number of cities, Google Fiber has reportedly suspended its buildouts in some cities and is also looking into wireless technologies as a faster and more economically feasible way to achieve its goals.”

In contrast, Google sees the Asia-Pacific region as a major growth area, making investments in India, Japan, and Taiwan.

That region also leads globally for 10 Mbps broadband adoption and average peak connection speed, but Europe is not all that far behind.

But as for IPv6 adoption, meant to finally replace IPv4, the US leads the way at home:

Image Credit: Akamai

Image Credit: Akamai

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