SkyGiraffe raises $6 million Series A to optimize business for mobile
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From left to right: CEO Boaz Hecht and VP R&D Itay Braun. Photo credit: PR

From left to right: CEO Boaz Hecht and VP R&D Itay Braun. Photo credit: PR

This Israeli-American startup has created a hi-tech solution that could revolutionize low-tech businesses

Enterprise mobility startup SkyGiraffe announced on Wednesday the close of their Series A funding round, bringing home $6 million in new financing.

SGVC led the round, along with Trilogy Equity Partners. Along with the VCs, investors James Lindenbaum, founder of Heroku (the leading platform as a service which was acquired by SalesForce) and HeavyBit, Lookout founder Kevin Mahaffey, and Ilya Sukhar of Y Combinator fame are also reported to have participated.

Their $1.5 million seed round in October 2013 found them receiving backing from Microsoft Ventures, 500 Startups, Yuval Neeman, as well as Udi and Roy Antebi from RedKix. Then in December 2014, Trilogy injected another $3 million.

Co-founded at the end of 2012 by CEO Boaz Hecht and VP R&D Itay Braun, SkyGiraffe provides a key aspect of a business’s back end, allowing them to better utilize their enterprise resources for smoother operations.

Headquartered in San Bruno, California, they maintain R&D offices in Ramat Gan.

Hecht describes their platform to Geektime as one that allows large companies to connect their data and grant access to that data. Working with well known enterprise systems like SAP, Oracle, Salesforce, Workday, Microsoft SQL server, and others, they address the mobile needs for companies in areas like sales, operations and human resources.

Clients can connect their legacy systems, cloud apps and data through the platform with their line-of-business apps, and run the data securely to their mobile apps to employees in the field.

The new announcement is that in addition to providing a UI agnostic full stack mobility platform, SkyGiraffe now enables users to connect into that data model using any third party system like Google Sheets, Slack, or any other front end that they want to.

Image credit: SkyGiraffe

Image credit: SkyGiraffe

They provide the data model and basically allow for new ways to interact with it. For instance if a branch manager at a coffee shop needs to order milk, they can use a Slack conversation to get the order to their operations manager. All they would need to do is use commands like /milk, /branch 57, and /25 for the number of bottles needed.

Triggered by the message from the branch manager, the message would take the request and update the operation’s manager’s inventory list. This essentially one-sided interaction shortens and automates the process, making it far more effective.

“The complexity of the product comes from the data, and its capacity to read and write on multiple enterprise systems,” explains Hecht, adding that, “The heavy lifting comes from the data model.”

Their solutions work with iOS, Android and Windows devices, allowing for flexibility. It is also ready for deployment on an on premises, hybrid or cloud network.

Along with large companies that work with spread out workforces in the field, the potential for the restaurant, repair and other “low tech” industries to integrate this kind of technology to increase their productivity is significant.

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Gabriel Avner

About Gabriel Avner


Gabriel has an unhealthy obsession with new messaging apps, social media and pretty much anything coming out of Apple. An experienced security and conflict consultant, he has written for The Diplomatic Club, the Marine War College, and covers military affairs with TLV1 radio. He mostly enjoys reading articles wherever his ADD leads him to and training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. EEED 44D4 B8F4 24BE F77E 2DEA 0243 CBD1 3F7C F4B6

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