No, Brits are not googling ‘What is the EU?’ because they don’t know what the EU is
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Has Nigel Farage duped Brits who have never heard of the EU to vote against it? Not exactly.

Mere hours after voting to the leave the EU, Google Trends is picking up UK searchers are asking “What is the EU?” But Brits know exactly what the EU is

The United Kingdom shocked the world Friday morning as it was announced the country’s voters had narrowly decided to pull out of the European Union. It was a close vote, about 52%-48%, a result that went against public polling within a day of the referendum and split the country along stark geographic boundaries.

Now, with the very real threat of an extended recession and Scotland back on a trajectory to split from the UK, Google Trends is seemingly evidencing that many British voters might have been severely under-informed about the stakes of the vote. They might not have even known what the EU was.

"What is the EU?" is the second-most searched question in the UK over the last 24 hours, suggesting a large number of people do not understand the stakes of the referendum.

“What is the EU?” is the second-most searched question in the UK over the last 24 hours, suggesting a large number of people do not understand the stakes of the referendum.

While the top question is a reasonable one to ask in the wake of Brits’ collective decision, the second result is an eyebrow-raising, disconcerting one for people in the UK, the EU and people worldwide concerned about the global economic and political ramifications of the Brexit vote.

It is difficult to extrapolate if the majority of these searches are being conducted by eligible voters or younger people. Yet, the apparent lack of awareness of what the European Union actually is (rather than, say, what it does or how in detail it affects the United Kingdom) should probably set off alarm bells that a large number of Brits are simply unaware of how the EU works.

Yet, the question we should probably ask in response to these trends is, “Are Brits really that ignorant?”

In all likelihood, they are not. The question, “What is the EU?” has been trending since July 2015, exploding in search interest over the last 24 hours as general search traffic regarding Brexit also exploded.

"What is the EU?" is a question that has trended consistently since July 2015. Why would people search such a basic question?

“What is the EU?” is a question that has trended consistently since July 2015. Why would people search such a basic question? Image: Google Trends

You would think, by now, Brits would know the basics about the EU. And they do.

It might be that the shorter question is not indicative of a total lack of knowledge about the EU, rather Brits’ desire to refresh on a basic understanding of what the EU does or how it functions.

“What exactly is the EU?”

An abbreviated form of the question allows for basic, sometimes broad results and might even spit back recent news items. Often times, a simple definition will explain the basic function of something as well.

Google’s poor syntax has kept some questions short

Historically speaking, using Google meant not asking complex questions. Google’s ability to recognize more complex syntax is improving greatly, but shorter questions without common articles like the, a, an and prepositions used to be encouraged for search. That was one of the reason that exact-phrase search with quotation marks came about, to ensure desired results that did not remove smaller terms.

In fact, the further back you go, the more it was recommended not to use questions in Google search at all. And you only have to go back to 2011 to see that longer questions have long been actively discouraged when using search.

2011 infographic from hackcollege.com tells users to avoid asking Google questions all together. Image: hackcollege.com

A 2011 infographic from hackcollege.com, still popular today, tells users to avoid asking Google questions all together. Image: hackcollege.com

Old habits die hard. In fact, after Google announced a major upgrade to its search algorithms, Wired Magazine called the new and improved search “a little hit and miss.”

“Okay Google, what is…?”

Are there other major examples of such basic questions with seemingly obvious answers? You better believe it. Take one of the most popularly searched questions of 2014 according to Google Trends:

"What is the internet?" was the second most popular question on Google in 2014, implying people were more curious about the exact details and function of the web, rather than learning about something they didn't know existed

“What is the internet?” was the second most popular question on Google in 2014, implying people were more curious about the exact details and function of the web, rather than learning about something they didn’t know existed

According to Google Trends’ 2014 end-of-year report, the second-most popularly googled question of 2014 in the United States was “What is the internet?” The beauty of this example is that it is abundantly clear that people using the internet to search this question are assuredly familiar with its existence. The intent of the question is likely learning how exactly it is structured, what makes it work and more technical knowledge (Is it made of tubes?).

What is more plausible? That millions of British citizens don’t actually know what the European Union is, or that they want to ensure they have a basic understanding and up-to-date relevant info about the biggest political decision of the generation? We’ll let you decide.

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