From Austin to Tel Aviv, the OpenStack Community goes from local to global
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on Reddit
Share on Email

Photo credit: OpenStack Israel

Photo credit: OpenStack Israel

Join us on Thursday, June 2, 2016 to learn why the OpenStack Israel community is truly leading in global OpenStack innovation at OpenStack Day Israel

With the OpenStack Day Israel coming on June 2, hot off the heels of the OpenStack Summit Austin that boasted a whopping more than 7,800 in attendance, it seemed appropriate to take a step back and appreciate the growth of this important open source project.  Taking an active part in bringing the OpenStack community to Israel, and then driving the momentum over the years, it is truly amazing to see the evolution of this community both locally and globally. 

Over the course of 6 years and 13 releases, from Austin to Mitaka and back to Austin again, OpenStack has proven that it is no longer a theoretical exercise in open source cloud, but a first class citizen and leading player in the cloudsphere. 

In the same way that on a community level, an amazing evolution has taken place with disruptive and refreshing young startups beginning to prove themselves as leading players and giving enterprises a run for their money, the same holds true for Israel’s local scene serving as a driving force behind the global community.

This event in Austin has proven that Israel’s tech savvy has taken the OpenStack community by storm, and brought much of the startup nation into the lifeblood of OpenStack.

We are indeed finally on the proverbial OpenStack map.

This is visible on every level of community involvement:

  • Providing massive and important production use cases
  • Leading related and central open source projects
  • Contributing important code bases to OpenStack projects
  • Driving global community initiatives

Liveperson – a keynote moment

The highlight for the OpenStack Israel community, and when the OpenStack Israel Twitter account virtually exploded, was undoubtedly when Koby Holzer, fellow OpenStack Day Israel organizer and Director of Cloud Engineering at Liveperson, was being interviewed during Mark Collier’s keynote address on Day 2 of the Austin Summit. 

Our own Koby spoke about Liveperson’s OpenStack clusters spanning seven data centers, a massive 8,000 VMs on more than 20,000 physical cores, as well as their new challenge of taking their 150 microservices and going full scale from VMs to Containers, using Docker and Kubernetes. The underlying infrastructure runs on OpenStack, which provides them a one-stop shop for managing bare metal, virtual machines, and containers.

Liveperson has proven an early adopter of OpenStack. This is not surprising for the cutting-edge Israel-based more than 1,000 employee chat software company. They were even interviewed as a leading use case of OpenStack in a video series dating back to 2013 at the Hong Kong Summit.  Liveperson’s OpenStack deployment has since grown exponentially and diversified to new and exciting technologies, making them keynote-worthy material.

Leaders of related open source and OpenStack projects

In that very same keynote address, Mark Collier, COO of the OpenStack Foundation, discussed the three primary use cases for OpenStack. These use cases were established by the biannual OpenStack user survey, which provides invaluable data not only on the state of the union of the OpenStack project itself, but also the open source landscape as a whole. The top use cases identified by OpenStack users are containers, NFV, and bare metal, with hybrid cloud being a close fourth.

He then zoomed in on what he called the “container management revolution,” and described the importance of collaboration with related partner open source projects, the rationale behind this being that the survey says that developers tend to select application platforms that aren’t necessarily tied to a specific infrastructure.

What’s more, the fact that OpenStack is open source makes it possible to provide native integration to OpenStack by external projects without having to be officially under the auspices of OpenStack, thanks to the rich set of OpenStack APIs described in the session below.

Mark then went on to present the leading players in this revolution on the screen. Among the projects cited were the Google-backed Kubernetes project, Red Hat’s OpenShift, and Cloudify, the company that drives the Israeli OpenStack community (and that I am proudly the CTO of), infrastructure agnostic-orchestration. The most interesting part of this analysis is that while Kubernetes, Mesos, and Docker Swarm (Docker’s own project in last place) are all container-specific, and OpenShift and CloudFoundry are PaaS and highly opinionated, Cloudify is the only product among those driving this revolution that serve all three of the top use case for OpenStack: containers, NFV MANO, bare metal, and even the close fourth, hybrid cloud.

On the same note, AT&T, the company that took home the prestigious Superuser Award at this year’s summit, is also leading the pack in disruption in the world of NFV for their Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy project (ECOMP) their bold decision to go with a completely open source stack and cloud, based on OpenStack. In Israel, AT&T recently acquired the Israeli IoT technology company Interwise to serve as one of their few innovation centers worldwide contributing significantly to the strategic ECOMP project for AT&T and to their cutting edge IoT frameworks. 

AT&T’s ECOMP announcement is making nothing short of earthquakes in the industry, and setting a high bar that many will not be able to uphold. You can read this article of mine (Nati) that has gone viral, “Where AT&T Leads, Cisco Cannot Follow,” for some context. 

AT&T is not alone in its acquisition of Israeli technology to help fuel their innovation. Huawei and HPE, both huge betters on OpenStack, have both bought Israeli technology companies TogaNetworks and Contextream to help drive their OpenStack strategy. AT&T will discuss this revolutionary initiative at the Israeli event in the keynote.

From Big Tent to Project Neutron. Leading in code

OpenStack Neutron, the OpenStack networking project, was announced as the project with the most lines of code contributed at the last OpenStack Summit in Tokyo. Among the leading code contributors in this project are Livnat Peer (who will be speaking for her second time at OpenStack Israel this year), and Assaf Muller, Israelis of Red Hat. Additional notable major code contributions by the Israeli community are from Gal Sagie of Huawei Israel, who is leading Project Kuryr, the container networking project leveraging everything good in Neutron and bridging the gap for the container revolution.

Additional important Israeli development work around OpenStack include the OVS project by Mellanox (who are also official sponsors of the OpenStack Foundation) that has become an almost de facto standard for high performance networking for OpenStack, as well as Stratoscale providing their trademark hyperconverged stack on top of OpenStack.

Final Notes – from CERN to the Israeli Intelligence Agency

OpenStack Day Israel, in its 7th year running, has established itself as a global nexus for exceptional OpenStack content. This year’s event will include keynote speaker Tim Bell  Group Leader of the OIS group at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research — and an exceptional lineup of speakers. While it won’t surprise anyone to find nuclear scientists on the cutting edge of technology, this event will also have Israel’s own Intelligence Agency’s CIO discussing their strategic project of migrating their technology to OpenStack alongside CERN, demonstrating that even the most conservative organizations in Israel are not afraid to embrace cutting-edge technology.

In order to lower the barrier of entry, as it is truly community-driven, the OpenStack Day Israel event has once again opened up 30 free tickets for women, students, and soldiers who tweet at @OpenStackIL why they’d like to attend tagging #OpenStack Israel. We are also offering a 20% discount off the already subsidized tickets to everyone else who sends us their share on social media.

Join us on Thursday, June 2, 2016 to learn why the OpenStack Israel community is truly leading in global OpenStack innovation.

The views expressed are of the authors.

Geektime invites global tech and startup professionals to share their opinions and expertise with our readers. If you would like to share your point of view, please contact us at [email protected]

Nati Shalom, Founder and CTO at GigaSpaces, is a thought leader in Cloud Computing and Big Data Technologies. Shalom was recently recognized as a Top Cloud Computing Blogger for CIOs by The CIO Magazine and his blog is listed as an excellent blog by YCombinator, as well as the HP Helion MVP Award for his contributions to the OpenStack community. Shalom is the founder and also one of leaders of OpenStack Israel group, and is a frequent presenter at industry conferences.

Sharone Zitzman is the Director of Marketing for Cloudify, at GigaSpaces Technologies. In her spare time she helps drive local open source communities, including the the DevOps Israel community, and the OpenStack Israel community – and helps organize five meetups worldwide. Find her on Twitter or Linkedin.

Share on:Share
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on Reddit
Share on Email
Nati Shalom and Sharone Zitzman

About Nati Shalom and Sharone Zitzman


Nati Shalom, Founder and CTO at GigaSpaces, is a thought leader in Cloud Computing and Big Data Technologies. Shalom was recently recognized as a Top Cloud Computing Blogger for CIOs by The CIO Magazine and his blog is listed as an excellent blog by YCombinator, as well as the HP Helion MVP Award for his contributions to the OpenStack community. Shalom is the founder and also one of leaders of OpenStack Israel group, and is a frequent presenter at industry conferences.

Sharone Zitzman is the Director of Marketing for Cloudify, at GigaSpaces Technologies. In her spare time she helps drive local open source communities, including the the DevOps Israel community, and the OpenStack Israel community – and helps organize five meetups worldwide. Find her on Twitter or Linkedin.

More Goodies From Development


Scaling up in the Start Up Nation

Four simple ways to take your startup “Full Stack”

Taking on the challenge of Daylight Saving Time