One picture, thousands of possibilities: Meet Acanvas, a smart, remote-controlled canvas
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From Acanvas's Kickstarter campaign. Photo credit: Kickstarter

From Acanvas's Kickstarter campaign. Photo credit: Kickstarter

A new crowdfunding campaign presents a smart digital canvas, enabling you to upload pictures from a pre-installed collection of art or your own photos

Acanvas, a South Korean-Santa Clara-based project with a rather successful Kickstarter campaign, is a special kind digital canvas. It is placed on your wall and allows you to change your home design with the single click of a button.

It is actually a 23″ digital screen, which includes a WiFi connection, that can be easily hung on any wall without having to mess with screws, cables, and holes in the wall. However, the best part is that it can charge itself — and this is much cooler than it sounds.

A living art exhibit at home

Acanvas is activated using an application (Android and iOS). In partnership with Fine Art America, it is synchronized with a large collection of art pieces from many genres. Of course, you can also project self-created photos or art pieces.

To keep you from getting lost in the abundance, the art pieces are ordered by styles, from classical to modern, or as the company calls the product, “the Pandora of art pieces.” The channels frequently update with new works of art, making it easy and convenient to become familiar with new pieces and artists. However, pay attention to the fact that this is an extra service that is not included in the basic package. Eventually, much like every system based on AI, the more you interact with the application, the better it will match you with art pieces that correspond with your preferences.

While the canvas in and of itself is not a revolutionary concept (see the “digital window” by Atmoph or the digital picture frame by Pigeon), the most innovative features of this product are its built-in battery (6850mAh), automatic retractable cable, and mobile charging station. This means that the product will charge itself when you’re away from home, or when its sensors detect darkness while you’re sleeping. Even though it may sound like a gimmick, the campaign promises that the canvas’s smart system operates smoothly and quietly. The product should last 4-5 hours before having to recharge. The GIF below illustrates how the self charger works.

The battery ran out? Soon it will recharge itself

Isn’t that cool?

Acanvas’s Kickstarter campaign has already raised past its $100,000 goal. With 20 days to go until the end of the campaign, it has raised more than $111,000 as of the time of writing.

The basic, early bird version of the product costs $399 (too bad the $299 earliest bird specials have already run out) and the price includes a one-year subscription to the online art collection, which is $120 annually. In other words, while the early bird special covers the cost of the online art collection for a year, it does not starting in the second year, so it’s not a small chunk of change to use this device fully. There are also delivery costs to some countries that can add as much as $100 to the price of the product, so keep that in mind.

The product, along with the iOS version of the application, should be ready for delivery by October, while Android users will have to be a bit more patient and wait until December.

While this is product is certainly innovative in setting new standards for charging devices, we’re not sure that this picture is indeed worth a 1,000 words — not to mention hundreds of dollars.

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Hila Haimovich

About Hila Haimovich


I’m a blogger who enjoys researching the wonders of the internet and spending many hours in front of the computer, particularly in the search of magnetic gadgets that improve one’s quality of life.

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