Watch how Glide’s real-time video texting helps the deaf connect in new ways
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Photo Credit: Alan Weinkrantz

Through the magic of Glide, I had a chance to witness how students at the Texas School for the Deaf are connecting and communicating through video messaging – and it doesn’t suck up data

Walking into the gymnasium of the Texas School for the Deaf, you could be anywhere that teens would gather for a school event.

Dressed in sneakers, band t-shirts, cool hats and with smart phones and tablets in hand, these young adults are curious, smart, wired and connected.

Through the magic of Glide, which you can download on iOS and Android, I had a chance to witness and hear stories about how the students at this school are connecting and communicating with fellow classmates, teachers, friends and family across town, around the country, and all over the world.

The greatest advantage to Glide is that it helps the deaf communicate in a faster and more efficient way without using up the data plan or storage on the smartphone since the actual video goes to and is distributed from the cloud.

When you watch the demo below, try to imagine one person in Austin where the school is located and another … well, anywhere in the world.

They can connect in real time, assuming both are online, or the message is stored in the cloud and viewed when the receiving party opens the app and to their delight, sees a smiling and eager face at the other end.

It’s wonderful to see how such a simple solution is making the world a better place. Go Glide.

The views expressed are of the author.

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