Mycestro, the world’s first wearable wireless mouse, is now publicly available
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Mycestro - featured

Photo Credit: PR screenshot of Mycestro

Mycestro, the world’s first wearable wireless 3D mouse that is worn on the finger and operated with gestures, is here to bring the computer mouse into the 21st century.

Computers may have gotten smaller and more sophisticated over the years, but the mouse has stayed the same. This becomes problematic when you don’t have a flat surface or enough desk space for a mouse. That’s where Mycestro, a wearable 3D mouse that is worn on the finger and operated with gestures, comes in.

The Ohio-based startup ran a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2013 where $354,115 was crowdfunded, and the device was recently made available for purchase through the company website for $149.

Mycestro

Photo Credit: PR screenshot of Mycestro

Unlike anything on the market

Mycestro serves the same function as a traditional mouse, but can be be used wirelessly from up to 30 feet away. What makes the Mycestro unlike any other mouse on the market is that it can be operated with finger movements and thumb action. It is lightweight and designed to fit on the index finger, and the mobility of the device is ideal for cramped working environments such as airplanes, hospital rooms and even crowded meetings. It could also be useful for those who suffer from repetitive stress injuries due to overuse of a traditional computer mouse.

This device is designed to be easy to use, works out of the box, and is compatible with Windows, Linux, iOS and Android operating systems. On a full battery, it lasts for about eight hours depending on usage, and can be recharged via USB. The device also has a special strap designed to resize to suit different sized fingers.

Freeing people from their desks

The mouse can be worn even when not in use and only becomes active when the touch panel on the side of the device is touched. This means that typing or making coffee won’t affect or activate the mouse.

The mouse is controlled with a combination of finger movements and thumb activity. Scrolling is as easy as sliding your thumb up or down the side panel, and there are three buttons on the panel which are used for left, center and right clicks. Currently, only the Mycestro for the right-handed users is for sale, but the team plans to release a device for lefties in the near future.

Mycestro’s story

Created by Innovative Devices Inc., Mycestro has been in the works for over two years already. Nick Mastandrea, Mycestro Founder and CTO, came up with the idea while watching a businessman struggling to use a mouse on a flight. “From our incredible reception on Kickstarter through the development process, it has been exciting for all of us at Innovative Devices to be participating in the launch of a transformative technology. We are thrilled to be making the Mycestro widely available, freeing people from their desks and improving how users interact with their devices,” said Stephanie Takai, Innovative Devices CEO, in a press release.

How effective is such a device, really?

The real question is how effective such a mouse truly is. It may be a solution for carpal tunnel sufferers and could make it easier to multitask, but it requires users to learn how to use a mouse again. Another thing Mycestro adopters will have to deal with are the looks they’ll likely get when using it in public. This is anything but a subtle device, and it looks a lot like you’re conducting your own orchestra: hence the device name.

But perhaps these are small sacrifices to make for a device that could change our online experience forever. As the only wireless mouse on the market that’s wearable, it’s going to be interesting to see what kind of impact this device has.

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Nicole Hyman

About Nicole Hyman


A closet foodie, trend-spotting geek and writer, Nicole can be found at the intersection of tech and daily life. When not on the lookout for the latest tech to make life that much easier, she equips entrepreneurs with the skills they need to survive in the digital world. Offline she has been known to indulge in homemade gnocchi.

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