Overwhelmed with IT problems at work? An automatic platform has launched with $7M to solve your woes
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Photo Credit: Courtesy of PR

BigPanda hopes to automate addressing your IT problems and has $7M in funding from Sequoia and Mayfield, and advisors from Dropbox, Splunk, Netflix, VMware and Facebook to back it up

Sequoia

The old saying goes that if a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, did it make a sound? While this metaphor works for lesser important things (such as dying trees, of course), it definitely does not apply to a high-level bug that is reported but that no one sees because the reporting center is burdened with way too much data in this scary, information overloaded age that few seem to be getting out of with any sanity.

Okay, that was a little dramatic, but you get my point.

Thankfully, a new Silicon Valley-based startup called BigPanda formally launched a powerful platform that automates IT Incident management on Tuesday. The company identifies high-level requests and automates the detection, investigation, and outsourcing or collaboration necessary to solve these top priority tasks.

Assaf Resnick and Elik Eizenberg founded BigPanda in 2012 to tackle the rapidly growing market of IT management. Their new platform is starting with a bang: a $7 million Series A round from Sequoia and Mayfield, as well as advisors from Dropbox, Splunk, Netflix, VMware and Facebook.

What’s the secret?

Their secret sauce seems to be their use of data science to automate detecting and solving large-scale IT problems. Assaf Resnick, Co-Founder and CEO of BigPanda, told Geektime that only through leveraging data science, or the use of “pattern recognition, correlation mapping, and statistical learning to extract knowledge from a very large amount of IT data,” can IT teams manage to tackle the scale of requests they are dealing with on a daily basis.

According to Resnick, “IT teams face thousands of daily alerts about many areas of their data center: application performance, server health, network latency, etc. Today, IT professionals have to manually investigate those events and connect the dots between them.” To address this time consuming and error-prone process, BigPanda uses “data science techniques to automate those processes and do them at a scale of data that human beings cannot.”

So far, they have some happy customers. Mark Sonis, Operations Architect at Wix, the popular do-it-yourself website provider, claimed that, “Troubleshooting issues that once took me up to an hour to deal with, now take 80% less time with BigPanda. They’ve made it much easier to spot critical issues and to stay up-to-date as they evolve.” Even more impressive, Adam Singolda, CEO at Taboola, a large-scale content discovery platform that reaches more 400 million unique visitors a month, said, “BigPanda has helped us resolve issues in minutes that had previously led to two hours of downtime!”

The competition

Though IT incidence management is a market with a lot of room for growth, which partly explains why such big names are willing to back BigPanda at this early stage, there are not that many serious competitors. The main ones seem to be Moogsoft ($18 million raised in total) and PagerDuty ($39.8 million raised in total), as reported by Gigaom. Moogsoft identifies high-level issues like BigPanda, but also discovers problems that may be present in the back end. Meanwhile, PagerDuty works with group tools such as HipChat and Slack so that teams can collaborate on solving IT incidents, and also “allows users to do a postmortem analysis of the incidents so that they can reduce the likelihood of their reoccurrence.”

Only time will tell whether BigPanda’s data science approach outsmarts Moogsoft and PagerDuty’s leg up in financing.

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Laura Rosbrow-Telem

About Laura Rosbrow-Telem


I am a social entrepreneurship enthusiast: This is what happens when a former social worker becomes a tech journalist. I mostly write about startups, technology, peace and justice issues, cultural topics, and personal stuff. Before Geektime, I was an editor at the Jerusalem Post and Mic.

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