Google and Barns & Noble team up to take on Amazon
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Google recently announced a partnership with Barnes & Noble as part of the Google Shopping Express services

Photo Credit: Screenshot, Barns & Noble online store featuring Googled by Ken Auletta

Photo Credit: Screenshot, Barns & Noble online store featuring Googled by Ken Auletta

On a front long dominated by Amazon, same day book delivery service has just become a vulnerable prize up for grabs with Google and Barnes & Noble tag teaming to challenge the shipping king.

The New York Times reported that starting on Thursday, book buyers in NYC, Western LA and San Francisco Bay area will be able to get same day delivery for books purchased through Google Shopping Express.

Unlike Amazon, Google will not keep an inventory of books. Instead it will create a fleet of couriers to collect the purchased books from Barnes & Noble stores, delivering them to buyers within a selected four hour window.

The service is offered competitively at $4.99, whereas Amazon charges $5.99 for same day delivery for its Prime program members and $9.98 for regular customers.

B&N turning the page

Team Google should breathe new life into the old time brick and mortar book conglomerate that has seen its business plummet over the last five years.  It closed 63 of its stores and lagged behind in its online business.  The current deal presents an excellent opportunity for B&N to catch up.

It should come as no surprise that Barnes & Noble is joining the long list of retailers like Target, Costco Toys R US and others, all partnering with Google Shopping Express. Google Shopping Express is a same day shopping service, or in Google’s words, a means with which to “shop local stores online and get items delivered on the same day.”

Google started testing its service in spring 2013 in San Francisco and Silicon Valley and publicly announced it service in September 2013 together with the IOS and Android apps, through which customers could use their loyalty accounts.  In May 2014, Google expended their Shopping Express services to West LA and New York City.  This service comes with fee Google has yet announce.  Currently its initial batch of users are registered for a 6 months free trial.

It seems that Google is intent on expanding its empire to all consumer markets, driven to completely map out the consumer patterns of its vast user base. From search, to email, travel to shopping and of course communication, Google wants to know every measurable detail of your online life. Perhaps they’d like to know our BMI and blood pressure too. Don’t laugh. With wearables that’s a very real prospect.

While Google provides its service in a very beneficial way under the pretense of doing no evil, it should come as no surprise if one day you find yourself the target of paying entities while lounging around with your Nook, just trying to get in a good read.

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Emma Butin

About Emma Butin


Emma Butin is a technologically challenged geek. She loves everything that that is served in a no brainer effort. Emma’s obsession is to take big ideas and compile them into one button. That’s why she is working with start-ups right from their early stages distilling products to one button. In 2008 Emma Founded Kryon System, an international award winning software company with patent pending technology. In June 2013 Emma released her first book (in Hebrew) "About Economics and Love.” Today, Butin also teaches “strategic entrepreneurship in hi-tech” at the IDC Herzliya and engages in speaking around the world. Find out more at www.EmmaButin.com Find out more at www.EmmaButin.com

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