GetYou wants to give people social feedback, but can this encourage cyberbullying?
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Credit: GetYou

The Israeli app launched on Tuesday, giving users a platform to judge others’ online profiles and get feedback on their own

Credit: GetYou

Credit: GetYou

Whether we like it or not, we are constantly judging others and everything around us. It’s how we base our first impression, make decisions and it influences how we ourselves act based on how we want others to judge us. Sometimes, however, there is a rift between who we think we are and how others perceive us, and a new Israeli app is looking to close that rift, or at least make you aware of it.

The app, GetYou, launched in beta on July 8 as a social feedback platform for users to judge others and receive feedback in return. Along with the launch, GetYou announced that it raised $1.1 million in seed funding from RDSeed and Wix founder Avishai Abrahami.

Founded in 2013, GetYou is a new social network for users to make profiles and get feedback from friends or strangers. When you look at someone’s profile, you can say how old you think they are, what hobbies you think they are interested in or guess other things that you infer from viewing their picture. Users then get scores for how accurate they are at judging, based on how closely they judged someone to how that person perceives him- or herself.

Let’s play a game

The platform’s first application is a mobile game that uses semi-anonymous feedback mechanisms to show users what others think of them. In the game, the app presents a member’s picture and asks a series of questions such as “How old do you think he is?” or “Do you think she is a DJ or brain surgeon?” Quiz takers are then shown true information about the person and results are analyzed so those users are given scores at how good they are at perceiving personality traits, occupation, age and other criteria.

Users can then friend others who judged them to make new friends. A statement said the goal of the app is to breakdown stereotypes and preconceptions and to bridge first impression gaps.

“To date, the only feedback mechanism on the social web is through public comments and likes,” GetYou founder and CEO Dr. Orit Mossinson said in a statement. “GetYou presents a new semi-anonymous platform that will enable our community to give and receive, both by helping us see how others may falsely judge us, as well as showing us how we too can jump to misinformed conclusions.”

Mossinson continued: “GetYou wants to make the world a better place by fixing the judgmental, wrong first impression crisis in a fun way. We are all guilty of making assumptions about people, based on first impressions. This crisis of false judgment is exactly what we are going to fix with our engaging, interactive game, the first application of our social feedback technology.”

Not sure if I GetYou

Thats all well and good, but lets be real here, no one uses the internet to judge people positively. Judging people online often leads to things like cyberbullying and hurtful comments. Even if the app doesn’t allow for negative judgments, it still is encouraging people to judge others online. I would guess that the type of people who would use this app are the type of people who already seek validation from others and from other online sources, and seeking out judgment and validation from others never really ends well.

Over the last few years cyberbullying has exploded and Youtube has seen a recent trend of girls asking “Am I pretty or ugly?” Many of the comments on those videos show that delivering compliments online is becoming less common, replaced by insults and negative judgments that are hurtful and just mean.

When asked about GetYou’s chances of becoming a vehicle for this kind of judgment, Mossinson said there is “no negative feedback option. [The] app’s mission is to empower people. You know what people think about you at first glance (what’s your age/ profession / etc) and how your existing contacts bubble your characteristics (no negative options). No free comments space and no anonymous option, so it’s only empowering.”

I hope that is true, because looking to capitalize on the tendencies to judge people online would just be wrong.

Video: Who are you?

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Aviva Gat

About Aviva Gat


Olah Chadasha and former finance reporter from New York City. Gat is a writer, runner and traveler who came to Israel for the good food and weather. She writes for Geektime’s English and global desk.

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