Surfingbird raises $2.5M
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Credit: PR

The Russian webpage recommendation site gets a new round of funding

Credit: PR

Credit: PR

Russian webpage recommendation website Surfingbird.ru raised $2.5 million in second round funding, according to Russian business news site Vedomosti.

Klever Internet Investments Limited (KIIL) providing the funds in exchange for 25.1% of the company, Vedomosti wrote.

By 2012, Surfingbird had raised two rounds of funding of $400,000 and $2.5 million, respectively, from Western and Russian business angels, the article said.

What exactly is Surfingbird?

“We wish we could tell that it’s all about love,” the company wrote on its website. “Or rescuing dolphins. Quantum physics. About Mars colonization. About something very, very important. But to be honest, Surfingbird is just a box full of pretty cool stuff. There are maybe even dolphins inside. Who knows?”

Founded in 2010, Surfingbird is similar to StumbleUpon.com, in that it recommends websites based on what users personally find interesting. When registered users click on things they like, Surfingbird tracks their preferences and recommends similar sites.

Users can also share things that they find interesting. Users can create channels for other users to view and like.

Russia appears to have another web-page recommendation website called Anews.ru.

KIIL is an investment vehicle of Moscow based Klever Asset Management. The firm is reportedly managing about $1 billion in assets.

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Aviva Gat

About Aviva Gat


Olah Chadasha and former finance reporter from New York City. Gat is a writer, runner and traveler who came to Israel for the good food and weather. She writes for Geektime’s English and global desk.

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